Someone is WRONG on the internet. . .again!

Rather than writing (which I should be), I found myself sucked down a rabbit hole I normally know better than to avoid: Quora.

[With apologies for my post title to Randall Munroe and his great comic, specifically Duty Calls.]

This is the question that snared my attention: What is your opinion of the FATE RPG system (the one with the fudge dice)?

TLDR; I didn’t add an answer of my own. Francis Dickinson nailed it. +eleventy

However, another never-played-Fate maroon felt compelled to vomit into the void. I won’t reprint Ryan Marshall’s answer except to point out that his entire experience with Fate is that he “powered [reading] on through [Fate Core] anyway” already operating on the presumption that he didn’t like it. Confirmation bias much, bro? Feel free to downvote his answer at your leisure.

Here’s my answer to his bloviation (also featured on Quora with slightly different formatting):

You’re missing some crucial distinctions, Ryan.

For the sake of argument, I’ll stipulate to your (and my daughter’s) premise that Captain America is “the perfect soldier.” Steve still has plenty of opportunities to accumulate Fate points. Any reading of the things that happen to him during any comic or movie in which he is featured demonstrate this narrative fixture. He has weaknesses in the form of human interactions and emotional blind spots. His primary Trouble could be expressed as Loyal to a Fault. It drives the entire plot of The Winter Soldier.

Also, consider that a player in a Fate-based game accumulates fate points whenever her character is compelled to a decision or an event by an aspect. It does NOT have to be that character’s aspect. Any aspect in play is eligible for compels and invocations at any time. You could, in theory, make your personal version of Steve Rogers as “perfect” as you like and still accumulate a fate point when the GM drops Ironman on your head by compelling the game aspect Obey the Law. Whoops.

Let’s play “Name that Aspect.” I’ll bet you can come up with the character “flaw” that compels Steve NOT to turn over Fury’s flash drive to Pierce in The Winter Soldier and thereby become a fugitive and an enemy of the state. Hint: It rhymes with An Overdeveloped Sense of _____.